Sheldon Silver

We got Sheldon Silver, but what about the guys who bribed him?

What will happen to other parties involved in illegal activity surrounding the Sheldon Silver conviction, including Weitz & Luxenberg? "So much for the hooker," Author Bob McManus writes. "What of the johns?"

Sheldon Silver will collect state pension despite conviction on corruption charges

Despite his conviction, former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver will still collect a $90,750 per year pension -- 75 percent of his former $121,000 salary. "He abused the public trust, but he expects the public to continue to pay him his pension," Citizens Union Executive Director Dick Dadey says. Because Silver became assembly speaker before 2011, his pension is safe, unless he owes the government financial penalties he cannot pay.

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Silver Hauled Away

Asbestos litigation was at the heart of the corruption trial of Sheldon Silver, City Journal Editor Steven Malanga writes. New York's asbestos courts have awarded $313 million over the last few years, and they still award punitive damages for asbestos claims, a practice that has been phased out in most U.S. courts. According to a Wall Street Journal article, “[D]ozens of defense attorneys [...] say New York’s asbestos docket has been rigged to favor one tort firm: Weitz & Luxenberg, the same powerhouse asbestos firm that benefited from an association with Mr. Silver.”

After Silver: Legal Reform is Ethics Reform

The New York City asbestos docket, NYCAL, routinely pays out triple the national average for asbestos awards, notes Thomas Stebbins, executive director of the Lawsuit Reform Alliance of New York. Former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver's conviction for corruption is tied to the lucrative nature of NYCAL, Stebbins notes, and calls for asbestos trust transparency to help address the problem.

‘Stressed Out’ Juror Asks to be Excused from Sheldon Silver Deliberations

A juror asked U.S. District Judge Valerie Caproni to be excused from further deliberations in the corruption trial of former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. Less than two hours after deliberations began, the juror wrote in a note that she was "feeling pressured, stressed out," because her opinions differed from the other jurors. "I don’t feel like I can be myself right now! I need to leave!" she wrote.

Columbia sanctions ‘corrupt’ doc in Sheldon Silver scheme

Because Columbia University cannot fire Dr. Robert Taub, the tenured researcher who had a quid pro quo agreement with now-convicted former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, the school has stripped him of his grant money, title and staff raises. Dr. Taub exchanged asbestos patient referrals to Weitz & Luxenberg, Silver's private law firm, and in return received state research funds arranged for by Silver. In an affidavit, Dr. Taub said the university has fired him from 75 percent of his job.

What to Expect in Week 4 of Sheldon Silver’s Trial

Closing arguments in the trial of former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver will take most of the day Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, Manhattan Judge Valerie Caproni said. Closing arguments will be followed by juror instruction of the law and deliberations. The jury will consider four counts of honest services fraud, two counts of extortion and one count of money laundering against Silver.

Sheldon Silver is the political equivalent of a squeegee man

"He did it for the money," Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew Goldstein told jurors before they began deliberating charges against former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. “His services were corrupted by his greed and lies, by bribery, kickbacks and extortion." Among charges against Silver is the accusation that he pocketed millions of dollars in asbestos referral fees as a result of a quid pro quo arrangement with a prominent cancer researcher to whom he pushed state research funds. Author Kyle Smith compares Silver's acts to those of a "squeegee man."

Silver’s Corruption Trial Closes with Competing Views of His Actions

Dysfunction is not an excuse for illegal behavior, the government argued in its closing statements in a corruption trial against former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. “To taint your fellow legislators and the democratic process with your own corruption, and say that that’s politics as usual, it is not even close,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew Goldstein said, asking jurors not to let Silver's actions stand. In addition to a real estate scheme, Silver is accused of having a quid pro quo arrangement with a prominent cancer researcher in which he exchanged state funds for asbestos claimant referrals to his private law practice, Weitz & Luxenberg. 

Sheldon Silver Trial Ends: Politics as Usual or Criminal Acts?

"This, ladies and gentlemen, was bribery. This was extortion. This was corruption. The real deal. Do not let it stand," Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew Goldstein told the jury in closing arguments against former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. Silver is accused of having a quid pro quo relationship with a prominent cancer researcher in which he arranged for state research grants in exchange for asbestos claimant referrals to his private law practice, Weitz & Luxenberg.

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